A Quiet Place Part II was Shot on Panavision’s Panaflex Millennium XL2 and T Glass

Another celluloid masterpiece is going to land at theaters in September. A Quiet Place Part II directed by John Krasinski and shot by Polly Morgan on the Panavision XL2 paired with the wonderful T-series anamorphic. One more proof that film is alive and kicking.

Cinematographer BSC ASC Polly Morgan, left, and Millicent Simmonds on the set of Paramount Pictures’ “A Quiet Place Part II.” Photo by Jonny Cournoyer. © 2019 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved

A Quiet Place part II: Just like part I – A Celluloid creation

Polly Morgan was the cinematographer for A Quiet Place Part II, replacing Charlotte Bruus Christensen from the primary film. Morgan continued the primary film’s use of 35 mm film and described its effect, “Although A Quiet Place 2 may be a horror, it’s pretty and interesting , with a nostalgic look that you simply would find hard to realize digitally”. The film is following the events reception when the Abbott family now face the terrors of the surface world. Forced to venture into the unknown, they realize the creatures that hunt by sound aren’t the sole threats lurking beyond the sand path. Both films (I and II) were directed by John Krasinski. the primary was very successful, and therefore the second is extremely much promising also . The film’s premiere happened on March 8, 2020, in ny City. World wide release dates are postponed thanks to the outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19). inspect the trailer below:

Shooting dark scenes with film
The film contains a huge amount of dark scenes, which are the Achilles Heel of film and therefore the main advantages of the digitals. However, consistent with DP Polly Morgan BSC ASC, this was a no brainer. the very fact is that the film’s “extensive dark situations” (night scenes and stage work that comprised 75% of screen time) were shot with Kodak Vision3 500T 5219 film stock for the dark scenes, while Vision3 250D 5207 was used mainly for day exteriors. Furthermore, Morgan filmed with Panavision Panaflex Millennium XL2 cameras (were chosen after “extensive testing”) and T-Series anamorphic lenses, which had been adjusted to match the C-Series lenses Christensen used on the primary film, and to optimize their close-focus abilities and performance in low light. With wrote about those lenses within the articles: Panavision T-Series Anamorphic: The Lenses Behind Line of Duty, and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Proves That Film is (Still) The King. be happy to catch a glimpse at those.

Cinematographer BSC ASC Polly Morgan, left, and Millicent Simmonds on the set of Paramount Pictures’ “A Quiet Place Part II.” Photo by Jonny Cournoyer. © 2019 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved

Focus on the art, not on the technicals 

A 35mm 1000 ft film (about 300 meters) will run 11 minutes in 24 fps and can cost about $800. that’s to mention , shooting Kodak 35mm at regular speed (not slow motion) will cost you $70 per minute. IMAX film costs even further (A roll of 1000 feet of 65mm Kodak film is around $1000 – read more: IMAX Filmmaking: what’s it wish to Shoot on an IMAX Film Camera?). the worth factor forces you to specialise in the art instead of on the technicals. “On a practical level, it had been so refreshing to steer round the sets with my exposure meter and not be stuck during a DIT tent judging the exposure on a monitor,” reveals Morgan. “The rhythm and discipline of shooting on film create a really healthy focus for the cast and crew”.

Cinematographer BSC ASC Polly Morgan. Source: Wikipedia. Credit: Unknown
On a practical level, it was so refreshing to walk around the sets with my light meter and not be stuck in a DIT tent judging the exposure on a monitor.
Cinematographer BSC ASC Polly Morgan

A lot of cinematographers admit that the film extracts more regarding creativity and therefore the results are enhanced organically. Furthermore, the film allows the neutralization of the digital fatigue we are experiencing in recent years. We wrote an in-depth article thereon definition, which you’ll read: The Digital Cinema has Brought the Film Cameras Back within the Game.

Have a glance at the video below that shows the making of A Quiet Place Part II (B-Roll):

Film cameras made a comeback

Statistically speaking, once we examine major film contests, we see that the leading cameras are film cameras. inspect the camera charts of the 77th Golden Globe Awards: movie Nominees, and Oscar 2020: 92nd Academy Awards nominees-Cameras below (click to enlarge the image). You’ll notice that the maths doesn’t lie. As digital cinema cameras are sprinting their way for higher resolution and larger sensors, old film cameras are still within the game of the professionals.

Film vs. Digital cameras and segmentation: 77th Golden Globe Awards & Oscar 2020
Film vs. Digital cameras and segmentation: 77th Golden Globe Awards & Oscar 2020. Click to enlarge.
Final insights
We always glad to explore new movies made in old film cameras. lately , DPs that prefer to shoot film should be admired for his or her creative courage and vision. Take, as an example , top-notch directors like Tarantino and Christopher Nolan that never shoot digital. meaning something, as film demand pure artistic discipline.

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