FPP’s “New” Super Color Negative Development Kit

You will note I have put the word “Super” in the title of this blog. I have been testing the recently offered FPP’s NEW Color Negative Development Kit and have been delighted by its performance. I have found a few differences (with FPP’s previously offered C-41 Color Negative Kit) that I believe make it premium. Here’s why and what is different.

FPP’s NEW Color Negative Development Kit contains: DEVELOPER – BLEACH – FIXER (Detailed Instruction Sheet included with your kit)

It  works beautifully on both C-41 AND ECN-2 film (the remjet type film – like Vision 3) 

The developer in the original kit was designed for color C-41 but I loved it equally with ECN-2 film (the remjet type film – like Vision 3). FPP’s NEW Color Negative is formulated for ECN-2 but gives the same excellent results with C-41.

Bleach and Fixer are separate steps, ensuring fixing lasts forever!

In the original kit the bleach and fix steps are combined to make “Blix.” In the past it was difficult to get separate bleach and fix in useable consumer quantities. FPP’s NEW Color Negative chemistry has kept the two separate, bleach and fixer – they are not to be mixed together, they are two separate steps. Blix (from the former kit), may not allow for full fixing. Thus, in a decade or so you may see negatives with fogging from not being totally and completely fixed out.

It eliminates the stabilizer step

You will also note the FPP’s NEW Color Negative kit eliminates the stabilizer step (from the previously offered kit)? If you are shooting modern color negative film, mid 1990s or newer, a stabilizer bath is not necessary. Modern color film emulsions have chemical stabilizers within the film emulsion itself. Stabilizer chemistry may also contain a surfactant, to prevent hard water from drying as spots on your film.  Use distilled water for mixing and final wash to prevent this. You can also use a Photo Flo type product as long as there is no stabilizer used. If you are wanting to process a batch of older films, individual bottles of stabilizer can be sourced online.

It has a long life-span with is recommended for use with 20 35mm rolls!

As with any photo chemistry your mileage may vary regarding roll count and length of storage time. The more care you take with storage, getting all the air out of the storage bottles and absolutely no cross contamination (never get even a drop of fixer in your developer bottle), the more you will be extending the viability and life of your chemistry. I have confidence with either color negative kit offered from FPP, but my first choice will now be the FPP’s NEW Color Negative kit.

Leslie Lazenby fell in love with photography when she was given her first camera, a GAF 126, at the age of 10.  Her first job in a camera shop with a custom and commercial photo lab turned into a 20-year adventure in film; leading to positions in darkrooms, customer relations, and as head of purchasing.  For the past 15 years, Leslie has owned her own business, Imagine That, retailing traditional photography products, photographic restoration, custom printing and video conversions. She finds her Zen next door at her studio, the Mecca, where she plays with her film cameras, processes film and holds small classes focusing on teens and young adults. You can hear Leslie on The Film Photography Podcast! You can find Leslie’s photos on her FLICKR account!

The post FPP’s “New” Super Color Negative Development Kit appeared first on The Film Photography Project.

You will note I have put the word “Super” in the title of this blog. I have been testing the recently offered FPP’s NEW Color Negative Development Kit and have been delighted by its performance. I have found a…
The post FPP’s “New” Super Color Negative Development Kit appeared first on The Film Photography Project.Read MoreReviews, Develop Film At Home, FPP C-41 Kit, FPP ECN2 KitThe Film Photography Project

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